Report on Q2 2021

Report on Q2 2021

30 Jul 2021

It was another tame and friendly quarter in the equity markets. The FTSE rose by 4.6% and the domestic orientated FTSE 250 by 3.8%. Rising commodity prices are more likely to be good for large international businesses than for domestic companies that often have to import raw materials or finished goods. Year on year, it still looks like boom time for the FTSE 250 (+31%) while the FTSE 100 was up by a more restrained 14%. The major story since Q1 has been the austere message from the bond markets. Once again the only direction for yields has been downwards, a strange reaction to forecasts of rising inflation and post-Covid consumer recovery. US 10 year treasuries which started the quarter at 1.7% and apparently looking to break 2.0% are back down to 1.3%. And UK 10 year gilt yields are down from 0.8% to 0.6%. What is going on? One point to make is that the post-pandemic bounce is being restrained by cautious or possibly panicked government intervention. In the UK, the official opposition, such as it is, is keen to accuse the government of lifting restrictions too quickly and eager to blame it for causing extra deaths in quantities and for reasons yet unknown. The leisure industries have become used to having to incinerate their plans at a moment’s notice and economically this is of course disastrous. In Australia, to take one painful example, a zero tolerance of Covid allied with a snail pace vaccination roll-out has led to huge and endless lockdowns that make Australia and New Zealand seem as if they are now situated on another planet, possibly the birthplace of Jacinda Ardern, who has declared herself the sole source of truth. Traditionally, the bond market is a better predictor of economic direction than the stock market (though to be fair the stock market generally has the predictive capacity of a dog chasing a car). There is also a spreading realisation that governments cannot afford to pay higher interest rates on their extraordinarily high debts. If there could be said to be a consensus it is that all the central banks know this and are trying to send signals that they...

PROBABILITY IS THE BASIS OF REASON

PROBABILITY IS THE BASIS OF REASON

8 Feb 2021

As far as I remember, the word “philosophy” means “love of knowledge”. Some of the philosophers whose books were in my college library tried to prove that God knew all the answers and others that truth lay in empirical observation or the meaning of words. “Whereof we cannot speak, thereof we must pass over in silence” – Wittgenstein. Somewhere buried in their philosophical texts one might find a grudging reference to probability. John Locke wrote that probability “is to supply our want of knowledge”. In the search for certainty, probability was to some, it seems, as admission of defeat, a last resort. A brief disclosure: the only thing written by me in the college library are the letters zzzzz carved into the leg of a table. The fact that I couldn’t see what Locke, Descartes and Wittengenstein were so exercised about was confirmed by my examination results. But I value the awareness of probability as highly as anything else. PROBABILITY – MAN’S BEST FRIEND?  Some people point to the fact that humans initially learn by imitation and get hung up on the observation that animals do that too. The ability to observe that, if A, then B, puts animals on the first step of logical thought. When I pick up my dog’s lead she immediately starts to celebrate her forthcoming walk. You could say that she thinks the probability of a walk is 100%. In Locke’s terms, the sound and sight of the lead being picked up has supplied her want of knowledge.  The weakness in my dog Hattie’s understanding of probability is her failure to appreciate that there are any numbers between 0% and 100%. Her world is essentially binary. But she should not be too despondent. Humans sometimes think in exactly the same way. The easiest example of probability is 50/50. When we toss a coin we know, assuming no skullduggery, that a head or a tail is equally likely. (Dogs always expect tails, obviously). We should also know, though gamblers sometimes don’t agree, that no matter how many times the same side comes up in a row, the odds do not change for the next toss.  For what it’s worth, this...

Covid ’20 – a personal diary

Covid ’20 – a personal diary

28 Dec 2020

This is a personal record to help me understand how and when this shitstorm blew up and if anything of importance was missed by me (or anybody else) that should or could have been anticipated. Most of the material comes from my email in and out boxes and has not been edited. I should say that the virus itself has never particularly concerned me. I think that there are broadly two kinds of fear, both of which we all experience to varying degrees. There is the fear caused by specific and known danger in the face of which some people try to hold their nerve and respond as rationally as they can. Dorothy Parker glamourised this kind of courage by attributing to Hemingway the phrase “grace under pressure”. And there is fear of the unknown which has a tendency to induce panic and paralysis. I make no claim to be courageous but I have a certain amount of contempt for fear of the unknown, though in the UK it appears to have gripped a majority of the population. The trigger word for these people is “uncertainty” as in “markets/investors/businesses hate uncertainty”.  It seems to me that the more that is known about Covid-19 the less frightening it is. It also appears that for some reason the government, its public servants and most of the media tend to promote fear and to suppress reassuring news lest it leads to complacency and (can I really be using this word?) disobedience. As an investor, as I have written elsewhere, uncertainty is to be welcomed because it causes assets to be mispriced. The problem, as 2020 has demonstrated, is that it sometimes takes extraordinary imagination to see it. Thursday 23 January  The Foreign Office advised against non-essential travel to Wuhan province. I cannot seriously suggest that I could have interpreted that as a harbinger of what was to come.  Wednesday 29 January  BA halted all flights to mainland China. At the same time, there were reports that the virus had definitely arrived in Lombardy in Italy. This is the point when it seemed real to those of us living in Europe and if I am hard on myself...